Akemi's Anime World

Anime Fan's Dictionary Reference

selected terms: 12

page 1 of 1

san
num.
Three.
sen
num.
Thousand.
shinobi
  1. n.
    Sneaking; doing secretly; doing quietly. This word is usually combined with other words. For example "shinobi ashi" = "tiptoeing/waking quietly"; "shinobi koe" = "whispering"; "shinobi komu" = "sneaking into".
  2. n.
    Ninja; spy; assassin. A short version of "shinobi no mono" (literally "person of secrecy"), the original term for ninja. Shinobi perhaps has a slightly more formal or old-fashioned air than the word ninja, although the meaning is identical.
shinobi no mono
Ninja; spy; assassin. The original term for ninja, "shinobi no mono" literally translates as "person of secrecy". Shinobi no mono has a slightly more formal or old-fashioned air than the word ninja, although the meaning is identical and the same Kanji are used to write both. Note that although ninja have been popularized in stories of fantastically skilled warriors of legend in both Japan and elsewhere, actual shinobi no mono were little more than spies, scouts, or occasional saboteurs and assassins who worked for warlords, mostly during the 15th-17th centuries. It is unlikely that they actually ever wore the black garb often associated with them now, nor did they use the straight swords sometimes identified as ninja swords.
Synonym: shinobi, ninja
shinu
012
To die; to be dead (continuous form).
shiroi
adj.
White (color).
shojo
n.
A virgin (female only).
See also: shoujo
shoujo
n.
Girl; young lady.
Synonym: otome
See also: shounen
shounen
n.
Boy; young man.
See also: shoujo
sono
adj.
That. Used to identify objects near the person being spoken to.
See also: kono, ano, dono
sore
rel.pron.
That [object]. Used to refer to objects near the person being spoken to.
See also: kore, are, dore
suki
  1. adj.
    Liking, enjoy, fond of, love.
  2. adj.
    Like, love [a person]. When used about a person, "suki" frequently implies a romantic interest. Though it can be used more literally as a platonic "I like him", its connotations are much more frequently closer to the English phrase "I love you".